Baking For Others

Chocolate-Covered Banana Pudding Pops

Posted by on Friday Aug 29th, 2014

Natalie of Good Girl Style is back today with a totally retro dessert, gone frozen, in what will perhaps be the only appearance of pudding mix on this blog for all eternity. Natalie joins us each month to share incredible desserts with Big Girls, Small Kitchen readers–desserts that are entirely gluten-free, but not like obviously gluten-free. That means no specialty flours or hard-to-find ingredients, just good old-fashioned butter, sugar, peanut butter, and chocolate. Don’t miss her recent summery posts, about Peanut Butter Buckeye Bars and Mixed Berry Frozen Lemonade.

The combo of chocolate and banana is a match made in heaven. One of my favorite snacks is chocolate chips and banana chips, but this time of year something cool and refreshing is in order. So I figured why not take my favorite snack and make it into a popsicle? These banana pudding pops are an easy and fun treat to whip together for a crowd. They’ll please young and old alike, especially because they’re dipped in chocolate. Adding the coconut oil adds a tiny bit of tropical flavor to the treat, but really it just makes sure the chocolate hardens nicely. The texture of a pudding pop is delightful, creamy and decadent but I like to think it’s at least a slightly healthy treat.

The recipe can be doubled or even tripled if you have enough popsicle molds. Don’t forget to buy the popsicle sticks! You can probably find the popsicle sticks at the grocery store, but I got mine at a good old-fashioned hardware store…you know the kind, the kind with everything and the kitchen sink (truly!). Unmolding the treats can be a bit of an art, but submerging the tray in a bowl of hot water or running them under hot water for a few minutes should do the trick. Be sure to give a nice tug on them to get the popsicle out in one piece. And give your freezer rungs a good scrub before resting the popsicles on them. But a freezer full of gorgeous chocolate-dipped banana pudding pops is a beautiful sight indeed!

Mocha Layered Ice Cream Cake

Posted by on Friday Aug 15th, 2014

Natalie of Good Girl Style is back today with a beautiful dessert that requires nothing more than time and ice cream. The beauty (and tastiness) is in how they’re arranged. Natalie joins us each month to share incredible desserts with Big Girls, Small Kitchen readers–desserts that are entirely gluten-free, but not like obviously gluten-free. That means no specialty flours or hard-to-find ingredients, just good old-fashioned butter, sugar, peanut butter, ice cream, and coffee. Don’t miss her recent summery posts, about Coffee Granita and Easy Mango Sorbet with Coconut Cream.

In August we cling tightly to our beloved iced coffees, eschewing the hot brews until it’s downright cold outside. But when days are filled with back-to-school busy-ness and perhaps a chilly morning or two, we start to think of hot beverages again. That thought fades quickly, of course, when it’s nearly 90 degrees in the afternoon and we’re craving iced coffee again. What a cycle! A mocha layered ice cream cake is the perfect compromise for bringing these luxurious caffeinated flavors to life on a late-summer day.

The chocolate, coffee, and vanilla ice cream are reminiscent of a layered espresso-based mocha drink, and topped with whipped cream and chocolate-covered espresso beans, it is an indulgent treat. Use the best-quality ice cream you can afford. Since it’s the unequivocal star of this dessert, you can really taste the difference. Lining the pan with cling wrap makes removing the ice cream cake a snap. Dip your knife in hot water to keep the slices clean and serve immediately to minimize melting. Depending on the size of your loaf pan, you might not need all of the ice cream, but it’s better to have too much than too little! You know what to do with the leftovers.

Peanut Butter Buckeye Bars

Posted by on Monday Aug 4th, 2014

Natalie of Good Girl Style is back today with the dessert you’ve been waiting for, albeit unconsciously. That’s because, deep down, you always want peanut butter and chocolate–together. Natalie joins us each month to share incredible desserts with Big Girls, Small Kitchen readers–desserts that are entirely gluten-free, but not like obviously gluten-free. That means no specialty flours or hard-to-find ingredients, just good old-fashioned butter, sugar, peanut butter, and chocolate. Don’t miss her recent summery posts, about Coffee Granita and Easy Mango Sorbet with Coconut Cream.

Oh, chocolate and peanut butter, how good you are. Sonnets and songs can be written about the flavor combination, and it’s one of my favorites in just about any form. This creamy, peanut buttery goodness is a mix between a buckeye and a REESE’S Peanut Butter Cup. If you’re familiar with buckeyes, the round peanut butter candy dipped in chocolate with an ‘eye’ left to show the candy (they’re modeled after the buckeye tree nuts), you’ll immediately understand the appeal of the candy in bar form. The trees themselves are generally found in the Midwest, particularly Ohio, but the candy is loved everywhere.

The thick layer of peanut butter generously coated with chocolate can get a bit sticky on hot summer days, so keep these in the cooler if you’ll be taking them along on a picnic. They cut best at room temperature–if they’re too cold when you cut, the chocolate later may crack and leave you with uneven pieces (though they’ll be just as delicious!).

Toasted Almond & Cherry Custard Pie

Posted by on Thursday Jul 10th, 2014

Well, if we’re going on a cherry binge, we’re going to have to pair bunches of them with almonds.

They’re related, cherries and almonds, and that’s why their flavors complement each other so, so perfectly. In truth, I am not normally a pie person, but I make an exception for custardy pies, like lemon and shoofly, and especially for almond-y custard pies like this Toasted Almond & Cherry Custard Pie.

To make the almond-kissed dairy-free custard in this pie, I take inspiration from one of my all-time favorite summer desserts, the clafoutis. In a clafoutis, a small amount of flour added to the custard prevents the eggs from curdling. That means you don’t have to be a pie whisperer to win at this custard pie. You don’t have to be careful or precise, at all.

Almond Breeze Almond Milk jumpstarts the almond flavor; both almond extract and sliced almonds pump up the taste even more. (See all my Almond Breeze recipes here.)

Likewise, the crust: it’s press in! I know a lot of people detest rolling out pie dough, and hopefully there are quarter-lifers among you who don’t even own a rolling pin (hopefully, because I think that it’s sort of something to be proud of…minimalism and whatnot). No matter. Here, after moistening flour with oil and more almond milk, simply press the crust into your pan. It’s okay if the edges are a little rough.

Into that easy-to-make shell go pitted cherries and this famous almond custard–then, sliced almonds are sprinkled on top.

There is a similar pie in A Baker’s Dairy-Free Dozen–only that one’s made with coconut. Don’t miss either!

Easy Mango Sorbet with Coconut Cream

Posted by on Wednesday Jul 2nd, 2014

Natalie of Good Girl Style is back today with a dessert I hope you’ll consider making for any July 4th festivities. Why? Because her instructions provide a genius way of crafting sorbet without an ice cream maker and  whipping up “cream” without any dairy. Wow. Natalie joins us each month to share incredible desserts with Big Girls, Small Kitchen readers–desserts that are entirely gluten-free, but not like obviously gluten-free. That means no specialty flours or hard-to-find ingredients, just good old-fashioned butter, sugar, chocolate, and fruit. Don’t miss her most recent posts, about Lemon Bars and Mini Rhubarb Cheesecake Pots.

gluten free mango sorbet dessert

Mango is one of my favorite tropical flavors. It pairs magically with coconut and lime (and cardamom!), making this creamy treat utterly refreshing on a hot day. The color is so intense and cheerful. Design-wise, I love it paired with the freshness of jadeite glass dishes. The recipe can be made any number of times (do each batch separately in the blender) and frozen in a deeper metal pan to make enough to feed a crowd. Adjust the sugar once you’ve gauged the sweetness of your mangos (if you had beautifully ripe mangos you froze yourself you’ll need less than a bag of supermarket frozen fruit may require).

The brilliant topping, coconut cream, basically comes straight from a can of coconut milk. It’s kind of miraculous. So you don’t get lost at the store, remember that coconut milk is usually found in the Asian cooking aisle of the supermarket. Don’t grab coconut water instead: it won’t work! If you can’t find it, you can use regular whipped cream and flavor it with coconut extract.

Lastly, dipping your ice cream scoop in hot water will make beautiful scoops every time. For garnish, a sprinkle of shredded coconut and a dash of extra lime zest make this dessert extra pretty for guests.

The Anything-Fruit Easy Summer Cake

Posted by on Monday Jun 30th, 2014

I have been lazy in the kitchen. Last week, I cooked all of one (1) dinners, and you saw the soba noodles and tilefish on instagram if you follow. Though delicious, the meal was hardly ambitious. Partly I owe the lack of cooking to long summer days and fun plans. But we’re already picking up our CSA, which means there are vegetables in the fridge, which means I’ll be cooking again soon. I gotta!

This cake is for exactly that situation: when your motivation to cook clocks in lower than the percentage of your fridge occupied by seasonal vegetables and fruits. Maybe you picked up pints of cherries in a more ambitious moment than right now. Maybe you, too, are in a generously portioned CSA (great tips for using up CSA veggies in the comments here). Or maybe you come from the reverse angle, that you need to go to a party and bring a cake.

You’ve seen this cake before. The apricot-pecan version in these photos is another version of Grandma Esther’s Plum & Walnut Cake. When little plums are in season (September, round here), I make that. But in other seasons, I’ve found, the oil-based batter crisps up into a luxurious cake around any fruit, and any nut. That means cherries in July, peaches, in August, and plums in September. The flexibility also means that dried fruit works: plump dried apricots are a welcome addition in the colder months, and the add-in in the version of this cake I made for Food52.

Rhubarb Cheesecake Pots

Posted by on Thursday Jun 19th, 2014

Natalie of Good Girl Style is back today with cheesecakes. And not just your standard cheesecakes. These individual pots of rich goodness are topped with tangy rhubarb, still one of the main local fruits we’re seeing, as strawberries try their best to ripen (more soon, please!). Natalie joins us each month to share incredible desserts with Big Girls, Small Kitchen readers–desserts that are entirely gluten-free, but not like obviously gluten-free. That means no specialty flours or hard-to-find ingredients, just good old-fashioned butter, sugar, chocolate, cream, and almonds. Don’t miss her most recent posts, about Lemon Bars and Coffee Granita.

Being a midwestern girl at heart, I love rhubarb in most any form, except perhaps straight out of the garden like some hardy Minnesotans. But add some sugar and some creamy cheesecake and “yah sure, you betcha,” it’s one of my favorites. This rhubarb sauce is so versatile, my Minnesotan grandfather always had a bowl of it in the fridge to eat on top of yogurt, ice cream, cottage cheese, or just plain with a spoon. Here it pairs deliciously well with a cool, sweet, creamy cheesecake filling.

Pick thin rhubarb stalks with plenty of red for the most delicious (and colorful!) sauce. Just remember not to include the leaves as they are poisonous to ingest! This no-bake dessert is the perfect ending to a grilled dinner. If you use little jars with lids and don’t fill them all of the way, the cheesecakes travel well in a cooler.