Recipe Flash: Soba Noodles with Ginger Chicken Meatballs and Scallions

Posted by on Wednesday Jan 19th, 2011 | Print

Check out our 15 Best Ethnic Dishes at Home

As I whined about last week, I’m having a hard time finding hot food to put in my body without resorting to rich stews and creamy pastas. But the same old soups are getting tired, and I’m starting to crave texture, in addition to warmth and healthfulness. As any poor college student holed up on a snowy campus knows, ramen is an excellent answer to this question.

Using some leftover ginger chicken meatballs from a catering event, I created this excellent upscale ramen. It’s basically my version of Asian-influenced spaghetti and meatballs, with broth poured over it to satisfy my liquid heat needs. But it’s also an incredibly satisfying one-pot lunch or dinner. Try making the meatballs in advance, say, on a cold weekend afternoon, and keep them in your fridge for up to a week, or in your freezer for forever (that is, if you forget about these things like I tend to do). With a package of soba noodles in the larder, this healthy “stoup” will always be within reach.

From my kitchen, albeit small, to yours,

Phoebe, THE QUARTER-LIFE COOK

**Recipe**

Soba Noodles with Ginger Chicken Meatballs and Scallions
Makes 4 servings

For the meatballs:

1 pound ground chicken thigh meat
2 shallots, minced
2 garlic cloves, minced
One 2-inch knob of ginger, peeled and minced (about 2 tablespoons)
2 scallions, minced
3/4 cups fresh white breadcrumbs
1 egg
1 tablespoon ketchup
1/2 teaspoon siracha
1 teaspoon salt

For the noodles:

1 shallot, thinly sliced
4 scallions, thinly sliced (white and green parts divided)
1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 clove garlic, minced
1 quart chicken stock
2 teaspoons soy sauce
1 pound buckwheat soba noodles

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

In a large bowl, combine all the ingredients for the meatballs. Form into small 1 inch balls (you should get 24 or so), and arrange them on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake in the oven until golden brown, 20-25 minutes. Set aside.

In the meantime, heat 1 tablespoon of neutral vegetable oil in a large stock pot or Dutch oven over a medium-low flame. Add the shallot, white parts of the scallions, and the ginger, and saute until soft, about 4 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for another minute. Pour in the stock and soy sauce, and bring to a boil. Add the noodles and simmer until they are al dente, about 6 minutes, or as specified on the package. Add the meatballs and the remaining scallions to the pot. Taste for seasoning: if lacking in salt, add more soy; if you like spice, add some siracha. To serve, ladle the noodles, meatballs, and broth into 4 bowls and eat immediately.

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  • http://twitter.com/EclecticUnions Jessie Blum

    Ooh, this sounds delicious. I love the twist on spaghetti and meatballs, and the flavors sound wonderful together!

  • Lauren

    YUM. I need to try those meatballs. We were in an asian mood last night too haha http://wp.me/p1egou-aX

  • VBissell

    This looks so good. I love ginger and I’m always looking for yummy recipes I could use. Can’t wait to make this. Going to the store this week to get the things I need.

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  • http://otm-inthegalley.blogspot.com/ SeattleDee

    Yum, meatballs, buckwheat noodles and a ginger broth sound SO much more tempting than the Italian standard with heavy red sauce!

  • amabro

    Brilliant! I have some buckwheat soba noodles that I need to use up! Thank you!

  • Elyse

    Made this last night & it was delicious.  Cooked a small amount of bok choy with red pepper flakes, soy sauce & cashews as a side and the combo was great.  Next time I will add a little more veggies to the bok choy & mix everything together.

  • http://lanuchan.typepad.com Ranu R.

    Yum, great recipe!! This was so delicious! I added some spinach in, and I prefer a bit more broth, so will use more chicken stock next time. YUM!!

  • Jr

    What’s siracha and can you substitute it with something else?